BITE INFORMATION

Bite Definition:

To pierce the skin, especially with teeth or fangs. A bleeding cat scratch is considered a bite. Any contact with a bat or bats is considered a bite.

 

Who Gets Bit:

Children make up more than 60% of all dog bite victims. The national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates more than 50% of all children 12 and younger have been bitten by a dog. High risk individuals are the elderly and home service people like mail carriers and meter readers.

 

Pet Ownership/Pet Selection:

Before selecting a pet, ask your veterinarian about behavior and suitability.

 

Socialize your pet:

When your dog is a puppy, expose him or her to a variety of social situations which include people and animals. Make sure each of these outings are under controlled circumstances and done a little at a time. Continue exposing your dog to social situations through out its’ life. Don’t put your dog in a position where it feels uncomfortable, this includes teasing or threatening environments. Recognize how your dog responds in situations. This will help you identify when your dog is uncomfortable or feeling aggressive.

 

Train your dog:

Train your dog the basic commands of “sit,” “stay,” “no,” and “come”. This will build trust between pets and people. Avoid games like tug-of-war and wrestling. These games encourage aggressive behavior.

 

Keep your pet healthy:

Vaccinate your dog or cat against rabies by a licensed veterinarian. In the state of Florida, a rabies vaccine must be given at 4 months of age but can be vaccinated at 3 months of age. This vaccine expires in one year. Then the dog or cat must be re -vaccinated with either a one, two or three year rabies vaccine. Follow your veterinarian’s advice on a vaccination schedule.

Neuter your pet:

Neutered pets are less likely to bite: That’s a fact! Not only does neutering create a less aggressive animal, it also prevents pet over-population. Two positive outcomes with just one action!

 

Leash Law:

An animal under physical control, is an animal under mental control. The law states all animals must be leashed at all times when off the property of the animal owner. In Okaloosa County, “on a leash” requires that it be held by a competent person or under the control of a responsible person and obedient to that person’s commands to the extent that the animal will not trespass on the property of others. If you love your pet, leash your pet!

 

Bite Prevention:

Children are the victims to more than 60% of all bites. To make our children safe, these rules should be followed.

NEVER leave a baby or small child alone with a dog. Be aware of potentially dangerous situations.

 

Start teaching your children at young ages the following “Stay Safe Rules”:

Things to do to communicate you are a friend to a dog:

  • Stand still, facing slightly sideways, off on an angle.

  • Keep an eye on the dog even if the owner responds to your call.

  • Look at the dog’s ears, chest or the top of its head instead of looking in its’ eyes, bring your hand slowly up from your side, after asking permission to touch rather than shoving an open hand down from above.

  • Use slow movements. The slower you move the less threatened the dog will feel.

  • Always stand upright when near a dog. If you have to bend over, squat- never bend at the waist.

  • Use high vocal tones when encountering a dog; it is a less threatening message.

 

If a dog charges at you:

  • Stay still

  • Remain calm

  • Don’t scream

  • Speak softly

  • Avoid eye contact

 

If you fall when a dog charges you:

  • Remain calm

  • Speak softly

  • Avoid eye contact

  • Curl into a ball with your hands over your head and neck.

  • Protect your face

 

If your dog bites someone:

  • Restrain the dog.

  • Separate the dog from the area and confine it securely.

  • Check on the victim.

  • Wash the wound with soap and water.

  • Seek medical attention.

  • Call Animal Services and Enforcement immediately: (850) 244-0196

 

If you are the bite victim:

  • Stay calm.

  • Take in a good description of the animal or confine the animal if possible.

  • Tell an adult.

  • Wash the wound with soap and water.

  • Seek medical attention.

  • Call Animal Services and Enforcement immediately: (850) 244-0196

More questions about biting?

Hours:

Shelter Hours: 

8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday - Saturday 

 

Adoption Hours: 

Meet and Adopt animals:

10 a.m. -  4 p.m., Monday - Saturday

 

Vet Clinic Hours: 

Surgery by appointment. Call (850) 243-1525 or email pawsspayneuterclinic@gmail.com 

Walk-in for other issues, 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Monday - Friday

 

ALL SERVICES/OFFICES currently closed on Sunday  

  • Facebook - Black Circle

For Humane Society/Animal Control (8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri.): Call (850) 243-1525  

For After-Hours Animal Emergencies (sick or injured, active abuse, foster medical concerns): Call (850) 685-6003 

Lost/Found Pets: Call (850) 243-1525 or email acoatpaws@gmail.com  

Our Address: 752 Lovejoy Road NW, Fort Walton Beach, FL  32548

Contributions to the Panhandle Animal Welfare Society are tax-deductible as allowable by law.  

PAWS is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. Federal Tax ID #59-0815515 

Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services Registration #CH5664 

A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-435-7352 WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.

Website proudly created by Brand U Solutions